22
Jun
11

Crazy noises: D’Oh-in’ in the Wind

D'Oh-in' in the Wind1

“I’ll treasure this poncho forever.” – Homer Simpson
“Uh, you might want to wash that.  The dog has a lot of skin and bladder problems.” – Seth

For the third summer in a row, we at the Dead Homer Society are looking to satisfy your off-season longing for substandard commentary on substandard Simpsons.  This summer we’ll be looking at Season 10.  Why Season 10?  Because we’ve already done Seasons 8 and 9 and we can’t put it off any longer.  Prior to Season 10, we watched as the show started falling over, this is when it fell over.  And while the dust wouldn’t settle completely for another season or so, there is no bigger gap in quality than the one between Season 9 and Season 10.  Since we prefer things to remain just as they were in 1995, we’re sticking with this chatroom thing instead of some newer means of communication that we all know just isn’t as good.  This text has been edited for clarity and spelling (especially on “drunkenness”).

Today’s episode is 1006, “D’Oh-in’ in the Wind”.  Yesterday was 1005, “When You Dish Upon a Star”.

Charlie Sweatpants: Initial thoughts on Homer the Hippie?

Mad Jon: I don’t really like this one, but there some good parts. I can just never get into it.

I get bored.

Charlie Sweatpants: Disagree. This is one of the precious few in Season 10 that’s in my regular rotation.

Dave: Whoa. Didn’t see that coming. (Seriously.)

Mad Jon: Well, to each their own.

I love the hippies, I like the original trip to the farm, and the cut scene at Woodstock is classic, but I just can’t keep my focus when this one is on.

Charlie Sweatpants: This one has a lot of good lines and quick jokes, enough that I don’t mind the usual “Homer gets a job” type crap.

Mad Jon: I think my biggest problem is that Homer smiles too much, for me that is a hallmark of a bad Homer episode.

Dave: I’m with Jon. Some good bits but it doesn’t hold my attention. It’s not quite miserable in the way “Dish” is/was.

Mad Jon: But that’s me.

I definitely like this one better than “Dish”, but that’s not really a high bar.

Charlie Sweatpants: Let me then admit to an equal amount of surprise that you guys aren’t as high on this one as I am.

Dave: Pun intended, I’m sure.

Charlie Sweatpants: On quotability alone, this one might outrank everything else in 10.

Mad Jon: It’s is really a separation from the normal Simpson life.

I agree with that.

There are plenty of lines worth repeating.

Charlie Sweatpants: That counts a lot in my book.

Mad Jon: Well, when it comes to The Simpsons, you are a Viking.

Charlie Sweatpants: Thanks?

Mad Jon: It was a compliment. I normally trust your opinion on teevee, no matter how jaded you get with age.

Still can’t get into this one.

Charlie Sweatpants: I’ll grant that there are some distracting problems: the sudden plot shifts (factory ruined to Homer makes thing worse) are less than smooth, I could do without the fake tension at the end, and there’s the very un-Homer-like enthusiasm for new stuff.

However, in addition to the aforementioned quotes (of which there are many), I like that it did kinda make sense that Homer would like to just drop all of the near-middle class pretense that he’s no good at.

Mad Jon: Meh, that’s just a different shade of the job changing that haunts Zombie Homer.

Dave: Yeah, how is this any different?

He does it as carelessly and caustically as any of his other job transitions.

And it ends as poorly.

Charlie Sweatpants: It’s not wholly different, but here Homer’s selfishness is the kind you always expected him to have, one that’s basically pro-drunkenness and pro-lazy. Him being the super competent assistant to a couple of movie stars strikes me as a lot more un-Homer than him wanting to sit around and get drunk all the time.

Mad Jon: I see what you are saying. There is a different edge to it, but to me it still gets thrown in the category.

Dave: It’s an astute distinction you make Charlie, but as Jon says it sort of feels the same.

Charlie Sweatpants: I’m not saying it would pass muster in Season 6, or even Season 8, but I can buy hippie in a way that I can’t buy successful artist, mayoral bodyguard, or celebrity gofer.

Mad Jon: I can as well.

Those are all much, much worse.

But, I’m not here to compare season 10 jobs against each other, I am here to rag on Zombie trends.

Charlie Sweatpants: Combine that with all the quotes, from “You can’t like, own a potato” and “I’ll go shoot myself for bringing this up” to “the ideals our hippie forefathers refused to go to war and die for” and George Carlin’s perfect deadpan of “This man does not represent us”, and I can’t dislike this episode.

Mad Jon: Carlin was great, I liked all those things, the dog’s name, and lots of other things.

Dave: Actually the dog was great.

Charlie Sweatpants: Also, have you ever seen the video for “Uptown Girl”?

That may be the most un-hippie thing ever, in addition to being the gayest supposedly straight thing this side of the volleyball scene in “Top Gun” (Christie Brinkley or no Christie Brinkley).

Mad Jon: That was a very gay scene.

Charlie Sweatpants: For that and more (Castellaneta does a fantastic job as Young Abe, Brockman’s line about point shaving in Globetrotter’s games, Lou saying that the electric yellow has got him by the brain banana), I like this episode, warts and all.

Mad Jon: Fair enough buddy, Fair enough.

Charlie Sweatpants: Any further objections or thoughts?

Dave: None from me. I don’t hate this, but I don’t watch it regularly either.

Mad Jon: Well, I always have a love hate relationship with scenes used to describe people tripping. They are fun, but at the same time so over the top that it’s a little off putting. So maybe that also adds to the hate. But in the end – meh.

Charlie Sweatpants: Alright then, I’m going to go freak out some squares.


11 Responses to “Crazy noises: D’Oh-in’ in the Wind”


  1. 1 Chris
    22 June 2011 at 1:54 pm

    My favorite part of this episode is during Homer’s flashback to Woodstock, when Grandpa says “what you need’s a good stint in the army. There must be an enlistment tent around here somewhere.” My second favorite part is when the hippies are talking about Homer’s mom as being “a demon in the sack” and Grandpa says, “oh, you heard about that?” I agree, this is a highlight of season 10. Still not up to par for The Simpsons, but for a Zombie episode it’s gotta be top-10, maybe top-5.

  2. 22 June 2011 at 5:09 pm

    Is it just me, or does Homer seem a lot less Jerkass in this episode compared with the others in Season 10?

  3. 3 Mr. Incognito
    22 June 2011 at 7:41 pm

    I’ve got to agree with Sweatpants on this…this is near, if not at, the top of Season 10. Like Victor Dang pointed out, Homer really didn’t seem very Jerkass here, and him becoming a hippie is far more reasonable than an artist, bodyguard, or just about anything else in Season 10. There are several good lines throughout, and I won’t go there again.

    I’m not so sure about the whole job-changing thing, either…Homer never worked with Seth (voiced by Carlin) and Munchie; it seemed like he was just visiting. There’s even one of the hippies saying (I think it’s Seth), “Don’t you work at a nuclear power plant?” or something like that, implying that Homer had kept his job while being a hippie. In that context, a scene with Hippie Homer at the plant could have been comedic gold (if done right), when you mix the ideals of Hippies, Homer, and Mr. Burns. Most probably not “Wavy Gravy”-level 24-karat gold, but gold nonetheless.

    • 4 RCreed
      22 June 2011 at 9:47 pm

      Mr Burns hates hippies (as seen by Mother Simpson), so it could have been funny.

    • 5 Charlie Sweatpants
      23 June 2011 at 5:38 pm

      “I’m not so sure about the whole job-changing thing, either…Homer never worked with Seth (voiced by Carlin) and Munchie; it seemed like he was just visiting.”

      I agree with both you and Victor Dang about him seeming a lot less Jerkass here, but I think this does qualify as a new job type situation. He’s certainly not employed by the hippies, but given the wholesale way he changes his life, and the way the episode is focused on that, it amounts to a distinction without a difference.

  4. 6 ecco6t9
    22 June 2011 at 8:12 pm

    A Saturn?!

  5. 7 Nick
    22 June 2011 at 10:56 pm

    Gotta side with Charlie on this one. Maybe it’s because I’ve been exposed to a lot of the hippie subculture where I come from, but much of this episode isn’t far from what I’ve experienced. It’s also funny how as a kid, I never knew what was in the juice that made everyone start seeing crazy things. Now that I know, it makes it a lot funnier.

    • 8 RCreed
      23 June 2011 at 2:46 am

      Yeah, dumb question, but what was actually in the juice? I haven’t seen this episode in a while, but as a kid I thought it was marijuana. Was it just mushrooms or something?

    • 9 RCreed
      23 June 2011 at 2:50 am

      Ah, nevermind. Just check on SNPP. It was supposed to be a parody of Reefer Madness; marijuana, but extremely innaccurate with immediate visions and everything.

      • 10 Charlie Sweatpants
        23 June 2011 at 5:32 pm

        Wiggum mentions peyote, which is hallucinogenic. I’ve never seen Reefer Madness, but that makes sense as well.

  6. 11 D.N.
    28 June 2011 at 10:30 am

    Not one of my favourite episodes, but it has enough in the way of funny moments and lines (“it was sweet of those guys to blame an oaf, but really, it was my fault!”) to bear repeated viewing. Plus I love the appearance of the marching hammers from Pink Floyd’s “The Wall” during Flanders’ freak-out.


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